Posts Tagged ‘positive’

PART FIVE

SUCCESS AND MONEY

What do you believe about money? Do you see money as good or evil? What were the dominating thoughts about money from your family growing up? What you believe about money influences where you are today in terms of your financial success.

“To become wealthy, you’ll need to surface, identify, root out, and replace any negative or limiting beliefs you may have about money.”

Jack Canfield, p. 373

Our subconscious may be holding limiting beliefs within us from our childhood. Perhaps we were taught that “money is evil,” “there isn’t enough money to go around,” “money doesn’t grow on trees,” rich people only care about money,” or “you can’t buy happiness.” The things you heard often and early in life about money or the things you observed as a result of trying to get money have ingrained in your subconscious a belief system about wealth.  Uncovering this belief system will help you uncover any limiting beliefs about money.

Write down your thoughts about money. Write out what lessons or ideas about it you received growing up. Identify those beliefs that are negative and limiting. Once you have identified your limiting beliefs, begin this two-step process for turning those beliefs around.

First, challenge your limiting belief, argue with it, or make fun of it. For example, if you wrote down, “Money is the root of all evil,” challenge it with these thougths:

  • Money is the root of all philanthropy.
  • Money is the root of all great vacations.
  • Money is what allows me to be more generous and compassionate, to change the world for good.
Second, create a statement that is a positive turnaround statement. Write one that excites you to the very core of your being. Add this statement to your daily affirmations. You might write something like, “When it comes to me, money is the the root of compassion, love, and making the world a better place.” As you begin to say this daily along with your affirmations, you begin to change your mindset toward a positive money consciousness.
Money in and of itself is amoral; it is neither good nor evil. Money is just a tool used by people for either good or evil. Just like a brick, you can either build something with it or throw it through a window. The brick is at the mercy of the hands that hold it. The secret is to create a positive money consciousness whereby you think of money in a positive light used for good.
One of my favorite books is “The Go-Giver.” The authors share five laws for stratospheric success. The second law they uncover in the book is “The Law of Compensation.”  This law states:
“Your income is determined by how many people you serve and how well you serve them.” (p. 45) 

When your focus is on serving other people to bring value into their lives through your service or products, your income will increase according to how well you serve them. Every business started out with an idea of a product or service that served people. The more people the company serves well, the larger the company becomes. The same is true in your life.

If you are serious about changing your belief system about money, I would strongly recommend T. Harv Eker’s book, “Secrets of the Millionaire Mind.” He also hosts three-day events, Millionaire Mind Intensives and oftentimes you can receive complimentary tickets to the event.

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(Our daily journey of the last 64 days of 2011 is centered on the principles found in Jack Canfield’s book, “The Success Principles: How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.” In his book, he encourages his readers to begin teaching others these principles. I would highly recommend that you buy a copy of the book and join us on a journey to a better you.)

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“Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.”

Ephesians 4:29, NIV

Words are very powerful having the ability to build or destroy. Once they are spoken, they can never be retrieved. Often times, words are spoken without contemplating what impact the words will have on those who are listening. Words have the power to change lives for the better or the worse.

In our journey to build successful relationships, we need to understand the power of words and carefully consider our words before speaking them. We need to contemplate the impact our words will have on our listeners before we speak. Will what I say build some one up? Will it help them in a positive way? What impact will this have on someone?

If we want to continually build stronger relationships, then there are a few things that we must avoid doing that will hinder our progress. First, we must always strive to be truthful. Lying is almost always accompanied by negative results. When telling the truth may seem harmful, learn how to express it tactfully. Staying truthful allows you to be authentic naturally. You have the freedom to be who you are without concern of what kind of front you need to put on. It frees you from the stress of being found out or remember what you said.

Stay away from gossip. Gossip has a way of destroying more lives and causing more drama quicker than any other words. When you find yourself in the midst of a gossip session, just walk away. And it should go without saying, don’t be the one starting the gossip.

Jack doesn’t touch on this at all in his book and I find this to be of importance to me. I prefer to keep in check the use of foul language and off-color jokes and statements. When you refrain from using such language, you don’t have to worry about whether you offended someone or not. If you are the type of person who doesn’t care whether you offend others or not by your words, you know that there will always be a segment of people with whom you will not develop successful relationships. Personally, I prefer to err on the side of not offending and learning how to speak only what is helpful for others.

Building successful relationships requires us to speak with impeccability. When we take the time to consider the other person before we speak and learn to control our tongues, we have a much richer life and more fulfilling relationships. Stop and think before you speak.

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(Our daily journey of the last 64 days of 2011 is centered on the principles found in Jack Canfield’s book, “The Success Principles: How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.” In his book, he encourages his readers to begin teaching others these principles. I would highly recommend that you buy a copy of the book and join us on a journey to a better you.)

“Research has shown over and over again that the more you acknowledge your past successes, the more confident you become in taking on and successfully accomplishing new ones.”

Jack Canfield, p. 196

Picture your self-esteem as a bank. Every time you recognize and acknowledge a positive result, achievement, or success, you make a deposit. Each time you recall a failure or mistake, you take money out. How many of us are paying interest to the bank because we withdrew more than we put in the bank? We have a tendency in life to remember and recall our mistakes or our failures more than our successes.

Today’s principle is a challenge to remember the accomplishments you have made in life. So the first step is to recognize your past successes. Start off by identifying nine major successes in your life by dividing your life into three equal time periods and naming three successes in each of them. Here are my nine major successes:

First Third: Birth to Age Birth to 13

  1. Finished Cub Scouts program to become a Boy Scout
  2. Had my first successful deer hunt with my grandfather
  3. Won an award for my Pinewood Derby car

Second Third: 14 to 26

  1. Graduated High School with Honors
  2. First in my family to graduate from college
  3. Led a team of students to Saltillo, Mexico for a mission trip

Final Third: 27-40

  1. Organized intense week of camp for students’ spiritual growth
  2. Became a Financial Adviser
  3. Started a non-profit organization

This is a good starting place and gets your mind to start thinking about your successes. Here is a bigger challenge for you: can you list 100 successes from your life? These can be anything that you accomplished from learning to ride a bike, to a date with that special someone, or getting your driver’s license. Acknowledge the successes you have had in your life.

Now making the list is nice for a warm, fuzzy feeling, but let’s take this a step farther so it isn’t just a one-time feeling. Jack suggests doing the mirror exercise for a minimum of three months. Here are the instructions he gives:

“Just before going to bed, stand in front of a mirror and appreciate yourself for all that you have accomplished during the day. Start with a few seconds of looking directly into the eyes of the person in the mirror…then address yourself by name and begin appreciating yourself out loud…”

(A little piece of advice: Let your family know you are doing this!) Acknowledge any of your achievements for the day, the personal disciplines you kept, and any temptations that you did not give in to. When you are finished with those things, continue to look into your eyes and say, “I love you,” and hold that gaze. This whole exercise may sound corny and strange, but more than likely, your mind has been accepting negative impressions for so long that this will difficult to do. You start this habit for the next 90 days, it will transform how you see yourself and how you present yourself to the world.

If you are willing to do this for the next 90 days, will you let me know? I want to find out how this impacts your life.

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(Our daily journey of the last 64 days of 2011 is centered on the principles found in Jack Canfield’s book, “The Success Principles: How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.” In his book, he encourages his readers to begin teaching others these principles. I would highly recommend that you buy a copy of the book and join us on a journey to a better you.)

…And Surround Yourself with Successful People

Today marks the beginning of part 2 of Jack’s book. The next 14 principles center on transforming yourself for success.

“You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.”

Jim Rohn

Take a quick inventory of the people you are around the most during the week. Include family, coworkers, friends, social or religious groups you are a part of, and neighbors. Make a list and beside each name place a minus sign (-) for those people who are negative, and a plus (+) next to those who are encouraging and positive. What do the environments look like after doing this? Are the people you work with mostly positive or negative? What about those in your social and religious groups? Are your friends positive?

You have to begin separating yourself from the negative influences if you want to reach success in anything. Some situations you may not have the ability to completely separate yourself (well, you still have a choice in every situation), so you may need to find ways of distancing yourself. You have to choose the environment that will bring about greater opportunities of success. Hanging around that group of people who complain and bicker, the “Ain’t it awful club,” won’t be recognized anytime soon for doing great things.

As you begin to choose who you surround yourself with, look for those who are excelling in areas that you want to excel. I find it interesting that most sales people could identify the top 5 leaders in their organization, but don’t reach out to them to learn from their successes. Most successful people are willing to share things they have learned with others. Take advantage of opportunities to pick their brains. The longer you hang out with successful people, the easier it is for you to reach your own level of success.

Make the choice today to take control of your circle of influence.

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(Our daily journey of the last 64 days of 2011 is centered on the principles found in Jack Canfield’s book, “The Success Principles: How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.” In his book, he encourages his readers to begin teaching others these principles. I would highly recommend that you buy a copy of the book and join us on a journey to a better you.)

“Visualization–or the act of creating compelling and vivid pictures in your mind–may be the most underutilized success tool you possess because it greatly accelerates the achievement of any success…”

Jack Canfield, p.81

Visualization has been a key element in many people’s lives. Jack Nicklaus claims to have never hit a golf ball that he didn’t first visualize the entire shot from where it lands all the way back to his swing. The Olympic gold medalist Peter Vidmar attributes his success to the many hours visualizing his perfect routine from beginning to end. John Assaraf uses vision boards and he obtains everything he put on his vision boards. The list could go on and on.

Here are three key elements that Jack says are important for understanding why visualization works. First, “visualization activates the creative powers of your subconscious mind.” Second, it activates your reticular activating system (RAS) to start taking notice of things already around you that can be resources to fulfill your goal or dream. And third, visualization will begin to act like a magnet drawing to you all that you need to reach your goal. You will start to see opportunities, resources, and people drawn to you to accomplish your goal.

“Imagination is everything. It is the preview of life’s coming attractions.”

Albert Einstein

The key to visualizing is to see yourself already accomplishing the goal. If it is a particular car you want, picture yourself in it driving. What do you see, smell, hear, and feel? Create a vivid picture in your mind. Go to a dealership and have a picture taken with you in the driver’s seat. Look at this picture every day. You can do this with any goal that you have. The more vivid the picture, the better.

When you begin to feed this image into your subconscious mind every day, it creates a conflict. Your subconscious mind will go to work to correct the conflict. When you are sending positive thoughts and powerful images to the brain of the goal being a reality, the subconscious mind begins to create solutions to make it so. Ideas will come to your mind at different times as your RAS will be constantly on the look out for resources, connections, and ideas to make it happen.

Go back to the goals that you have written out. Be sure to add visual components to each of them. Commit to a daily habit of visualizing each morning and each evening before you go to sleep. This may be a 15-20 minute exercise but will have huge benefits. Jack says, “Some psychologists are now claiming one hour of visualization is worth 7 hours of physical effort. That’s a tall claim but makes an important point…” (p. 89) The practice of visualization will give you an edge in everything you do. Spend time visualizing your goals. Create a vision board with pictures or make a goals book, whatever you need to do to make your goals come to life. Practice this daily and see the results.

“MAN’S ONLY LIMITATION, within reason, LIES IN HIS DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF HIS IMAGINATION.”

Napoleon HIll

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(Our daily journey of the last 64 days of 2011 is centered on the principles found in Jack Canfield’s book, “The Success Principles: How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.” In his book, he encourages his readers to begin teaching others these principles. I would highly recommend that you buy a copy of the book and join us on a journey to a better you.)

“Most people drive through life with their psychological emergency brake on. They hold on to negative images about themselves or suffer the effects of powerful experiences they haven’t yet released.”

Jack Canfield, p.70

Jack opens up this principle with the idea of trying to move forward while the parking brake is engaged. We have all done it at some point. We step on the accelerator, and to get the vehicle in motion, we push a little harder until we realize we left the brake engaged. Once we release the brake, we move with great ease and less power.

For most people, leaving their comfort zones is the most difficult part of the process in reaching for success. We have trained ourselves to think a certain way and to act a certain way. This training may have limited our progress toward the success we truly want to achieve or dream of achieving.

Typically speaking, most people have an income range that they have found comfort in maintaining. Once they reach that level, they are satisfied and don’t move past it. If they do happen to win a large sum of money in a lottery, they will spend it to get back to that level of comfort. Unless there is a change in the mindset, life will continue moving forward in the comfort zone.

Changes in behavior can effect change in your moving out of your comfort zones. Upgrading where you stay when traveling, spending more on an article of clothing outside of your usual price range, or doing something like a black-tie event may be enough to push you out of your comfort zone. Once you begin to experience what is beyond your comfort zone, these experiences start to shape your new comfort zone and push you to another level.

Changing your self-talk will most likely be the one thing that can propel you forward faster than anything else. Napoleon Hill notes that Auto-Suggestion (self-talk or affirmations) is one of the core principles of those who are living successful lives.

AUTO-SUGGESTION is a term which applies to all suggestions and all self-administered stimuli which reach one’s mind through the five senses…it is the agency of communication between that part of the mind where conscious thought takes place and that which serves as the seat of action for the subconscious mind.”

Napoleon Hill, “Think and Grow Rich”

In Jack’s book, he gives nine guidelines for effectively creating affirmations that will have an impact. His blog lists five for public reading, and you can find that here. He has a couple of lists of how to use those affirmations.

Numerous people have shared their secrets to success over the years, and one common thread among almost all of them have been the consistent use of affirmations. The combination of self-talk with visualization kindled with desire and faith yield a life of accomplishment and success.

Begin writing out your affirmations and start seeing your subconscious mind work to make those affirmations real in your life.

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(Our daily journey of the last 64 days of 2011 is centered on the principles found in Jack Canfield’s book, “The Success Principles: How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.” In his book, he encourages his readers to begin teaching others these principles. I would highly recommend that you buy a copy of the book and join us on a journey to a better you.)

“Set a goal to do something. Something so big, so exhilarating, that it excites and scares you at the same time. It must be a goal that is so appealing, so much in harmony with your spiritual core that you can not get it out of your mind. This goal must be one that will dominate your thinking all of your waking hours.”

Bob Proctor, 2002

Where we are today in our lives is a result of the goals or lack of goals we have set in our lives. We must go back to principle one and take 100% responsibility for the road map we followed in life. We must know where our destination lies and make plans to get there.

This principle will be the difference maker. If you and I want to be a part of the 3% of people who are actually living out their dreams, we need to use the power in goal setting. Every book I have ever read about success has included this principle as part of the reason people have been successful. The reason people are in the other 97% is they never bothered to write out their goals and give their life direction.

PRACTICAL STEPS IN GOAL-SETTING

The first step is to create goals that are measurable. The most effective way to do this is to include both how much and by when. “I want to write a book” is not as concise as “I will write a book on success by 5:00 PM on June 30, 2012.” We have two measurable data points to track our progress. Be concise and add as many details as you can, and your subconscious mind will begin to work to make it happen.

Write out your goals. Put them on 3×5 cards that you can carry with you. You may even want to create a goals book using a notebook. Put a goal on each page and add pictures, words, phrases, or whatever helps you see the goal. At the very minimum, carry your most important goal with you, in your wallet or purse.

Review your goals daily! The more often in the day you review them, the more it reinforces your goals on your subconscious mind. Utilize screen savers, your calendars, your organizers to keep your goals in front of you.

A single goal is not enough. Make a list of goals you want to achieve. Jack suggests a list of 101 goals you want to accomplish in your life. Make each one as detailed as possible.

The final key is to remember that the following three things will pop up once you write out your goals: Considerations, Fears, and Roadblocks. Once you know they are coming, you will be able to move past each of them.

Considerations are all the thoughts that rise up telling why you shouldn’t do this and why it is not possible. They may have been sitting in your subconscious mind for a long time and have been holding you back. Now that you know they are going to surface, deal with them.

Fears are tied to your emotions These naturally surface as you move forward to new territory. Recognize them as part of the journey.

Roadblocks are the external events that try to get in the way of your success. They will come in various shapes, sizes, and times. They are part of life, so be prepared to go around them.

There are so many good examples in the book this condensed post is not able to include, from Jim Carrey’s goal-setting experience to Bruce Lee’s letter to Lou Holtz writing out 107 goals for his life. Successful people write out goals and see themselves accomplishing them.

Before you and I go any farther in this journey, take time to write out your goals. Write the big one, too!

“Set a goal to do something. Something so big, so exhilarating, that it excites and scares you at the same time. It must be a goal that is so appealing, so much in harmony with your spiritual core that you can not get it out of your mind. This goal must be one that will dominate your thinking all of your waking hours.”

Bob Proctor, 2002

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(Our daily journey of the last 64 days of 2011 is centered on the principles found in Jack Canfield’s book, “The Success Principles: How to Get from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be.” In his book, he encourages his readers to begin teaching others these principles. I would highly recommend that you buy a copy of the book and join us on a journey to a better you.)